How to Track Multi-touch Attribution in Salesforce

One of the most important aspects of marketing online is understanding the effectiveness of your different channels. Google Adwords, organic search / SEO, blog posts, webinars, email newsletters, and many more — all of these can be tracked if you are using the right tools, but your leads are not just coming in via one channel.

Frequently your prospects have interacted with multiple channels online before submitting a form and becoming a lead in Salesforce. These days most buyers are able to do fairly detailed research on their own before ever making contact and identifying themselves, so this trend is only intensifying.

Therefore, at a minimum you will see many leads who originally found you from Google Adwords or another advertisement, and sometime later remembered your company or ran across some of your great content and found you via an organic search, before becoming a lead in Salesforce.

Multi-touch attribution is the term for allocating credit across your marketing channels, to help estimate the impact each different channel had in delivering a lead, rather than just giving a single source all the credit. There are a number of different ways of doing attribution, from relatively straightforward to formulas and algorithms so complicated you’ll need to retake algebra. But most of them are better than single-touch attribution, meaning allocating 100% of the credit to a single way that a prospect came to your web site, when they really visited your site multiple times from different sources.

CloudAmp’s Campaign Tracker, a Salesforce app which helps marketers track sources, keywords and campaign effectiveness, is proud to introduce multi-touch attribution in our new Version 2.4. Now you can know both the First Touch (original source of how they found you) and Last Touch (final source that brought them to your site when they submitted a form) on all Leads that go into Salesforce via your web forms, in addition to the other data such as which pages a lead viewed on your site.

Having both First Touch and Last Touch data on all of your Salesforce leads is a straightforward and uncomplicated way to handle multi-touch attribution, yet for most customers provides a very effective way of allocating and understanding marketing effectiveness across your various campaigns and channels.

firstlasttouchleadsource

And once the First and Last Touch tracking data is part of a lead in Salesforce, the attribution data moves through Salesforce’s conversion process to the Account / Contact / Opportunity. So your multi-touch attribution data survives to the converted lead, pipeline, and closed won opportunity to directly relate to revenue.

Find out more by contacting us, or sign up for a 15 day free trial of the Campaign Tracker on the Salesforce AppExchange.

How to See What Web Pages a Lead Visited

When new leads come into Salesforce from the forms on your web site, do you wish you could know more about them than just the data they volunteered? Not only where they came from and how they found you, but maybe some hints about which of your products or services they are most interested in, and what parts of your web site they spent the most time on?

In this post we show how to use the Campaign Tracker, a Salesforce app available on the AppExchange, to quickly and easily show you which pages on your web site a lead visited before they submitted that contact us form.

VisitorSessionsEditSmallest

Why Track Pages Visited?

In Campaign Tracker 2.0, CloudAmp introduced a new feature called Visitor Sessions, which shows you how many times a lead visited your site, which pages they viewed, and when.

The capability was not driven by a desire to be “big brother” or collect data for data’s sake. Instead it was requested by many of our customers, who wanted to be able to better engage with their prospects, and get a bit of a head start in serving the leads who came in to Salesforce.

LeadPageLayout2withVisitorSessions

Campaign Tracker already provided the initial source, keywords, and campaign information about how a lead found a web site, but our customers wanted to answer questions such as:

  • How many times did a lead come to the site before submitting a form?
  • How many pages on the web site did the lead look at?
  • What product(s) was the lead interested in?
  • Did the lead consume a lot of content, or did they just quickly click the contact form?
  • Is this lead in the early research phase, just viewing a few high-level pages?
  • Is this lead in a later buying stage, looking at documentation and other specialized pages?
  • Is this lead unqualified (eg. only looked at jobs page)?
  • What else can we infer from the pages this lead visited on the site, before we call or email to follow up with the lead?

VisitorSessionsAppFrontier

How to Track a Lead’s Web Page Visits

Getting started recording which pages a lead visited on your web site is pretty straightforward. The Campaign Tracker has a free 15 day trial, after which it is available month to month for a low subscription cost (annual plans available for a discount). Install the Campaign Tracker from the AppExchange into Salesforce and configure a few things, then add some tracking code to the bottom of the pages of your web site, and you’ll be collecting data.

When a lead submits a form on your web site that goes into Salesforce (Salesforce web-to-lead or other form technology), along with the original source tracking data (keywords, referrer, etc.) a list of the pages, URLs, and timestamps of pages on your web site will also be submitted in the background, and inserted into the correct fields in Salesforce.

 

Using Visitor Sessions in Salesforce

Each Visitor Session record that the Campaign Tracker saves into Salesforce shows the details of a particular page that the lead visited on your web site. It shows the Page Title, Page URL, Session Number (was this the lead’s first or second visit, etc.), and a date / time stamp of when they landed on that web page. Viewing these records in the related list on the Lead page, you can get a general understanding of the following:

  • the path the lead took through your web site
  • which pages the lead visited
  • what pages the lead spent the most time on
  • what products / services the lead might be interested in
  • what concerns the lead might have (price, security, customer reviews, etc.)
  • what the lead looked at on repeat visits (if they returned more than once before submitting a form into Salesforce)

VisitorSessionsRecord

You can also retain this data as you move the lead through the sales process. When you convert a lead to an Account in Salesforce (with related Contact and Opportunity), the Visitor Sessions stay with the Contact, so you retain the record of which pages on your web site the Salesforce contact visited before they filled out your form.

In addition, you can get some aggregate data about the most popular pages on your web site, at least as far as those who become leads in Salesforce. It is a limited but potentially important metric, and one more more data point to add to what you learn from Google Analytics or other web analytics tools you may use.


Questions about getting page view data into Salesforce? Is there other data you would like to see in your Salesforce leads? Please let me know in the comments below.

Campaign Tracker 2.0 Now Live

CloudAmp is pleased to announce the release of Campaign Tracker 2.0, the Salesforce app which lets you track Google Adwords, keywords, and other source data into your Salesforce leads. Campaign Tracker has always been the simplest and best way of tracking your advertising ROI and marketing analytics in Salesforce, and now with the release of version 2.0 it is even better.

 VisitorSessionsRelatedListEdit

Visitor Sessions

New in Campaign Tracker 2.0 is the ability to see which pages on your web site a lead visited before they submitted a lead form. Called Visitor Sessions, this new feature is available right in individual leads and contacts within Salesforce for easy reference during the sales process.

See the page titles and URLs in Salesforce of the entire path that a prospect took on your web site. Session numbers even show repeat visits, so your sales and marketing teams can see at a glance what parts of your web site a lead looked at, plus when and where they returned each time they visited your site before they became a lead in Salesforce.

Now with Campaign Tracker 2.0, you can identify which products a lead might be interested in, and understand potential lead value ahead of time — all based on which pages they viewed on your web site.

 CampaignTracker2_Dashboard_SearchEnginesKeywords

Better Tracking Technology

Campaign Tracker 2.0 was completely rebuilt from the ground up to make it easier to implement and provide more reliable data collection.

Version 2.0 no longer relies on cookies or data from Google Analytics, so it provides an independent way of verifying lead sources and other information. Plus we’ve simplified the installation process to support pretty much any web site form you might have.


For a FREE 15 day trial, including email and phone support to help you get the Campaign Tracker set up and tested, please sign up on the AppExchange.

Guest post on the Salesforce blog: 6 Ways to build a Salesforce Lead Machine

Today CloudAmp Founder David Hecht published a guest post on the Salesforce.com blog that outlines some best practices for lead management and demand generation using Salesforce. The article is focused on small and medium businesses (SMBs), who face some particular challenges regarding budget and staff resources when it comes to these issues. But the good news David outlines is that SMBs can build their own “lead machine” using mostly Salesforce CRM’s built in tools, with a few affordable add-ons. Read more on the Salesforce blog. David’s recommendations include:

  1. Establish a Lead Process
  2. Use Web-to-Lead Forms
  3. Use Salesforce Lead Automation
  4. Track the Sources of Your Leads
  5. Set up Dashboards
  6. Develop an Email Program

Salesforce.com Blog >

“6 Ways to build a Salesforce Lead Machine” guest post >

CloudAmp Founder David Hecht’s Marketing Presentation at Dreamforce

CloudAmp Founder David Hecht will be giving a talk on online marketing tactics at Salesforce’s annual Dreamforce conference, Wednesday, November 20, 2013 at 3:45 PM in the Hilton SF Union Square, Community Success Zone Theater.

The presentation, entitled “Which Half is Wasted? AppExchange Marketing Best Practices” draws on David’s 18 years of marketing experience to provide an overview of marketing strategy and tactics for driving online signups and app sales.

TitleSlide

As part of the Partner User Groups sessions, David will focus his advice toward the ISV community working to promote Salesforce apps, but the tips and tactics will be broadly applicable to marketers of any product or service with an Internet presence. The 30 minute presentation will be divided into two sections, with topics to include:

AppExchange Marketing Tactics

  • Challenges of AppExchange Marketing
  • Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
  • Tracking your traffic (UTM codes and Google Analytics)
  • Blogging (It takes too much time but you have to do it)
  • Social Media (Be part of the conversation when it makes sense)
  • Automated Lead Followup (Use the tools Salesforce gives you)
  • Outbound Phone Calls (Does Sales follow up make sense for you?)

AdwordsSlide

Online Advertising

  • Pros and Cons of Advertising
  • Google Adwords (Not just for conversions but for research)
  • Social Media Advertising (Linkedin, Facebook enable amazing targeting)
  • Retargeting (Remind people who got distracted without signing up)
  • Other Strategies (Email marketing, Vertical Sites, Directories and more)

There will be time for questions during as well as after the brief presentation. If you are coming to Dreamforce this year, please come by and say hello.

RetargetingSlide

The Opportunity of ‘(Not Provided)’ Google Keywords

In late 2011, Google began encrypting searches from anyone logged into a Google service (Gmail, Google +, etc.), so site owners could not see many of the keywords from organic searches that were driving visitors to their sites. In October 2013 Google took additional steps to make search “secure”, so the majority of all keyword searches are now coming through as “(Not Provided)”. The trend is expected to continue until effectively all organic keyword data is blocked from your Google Analytics reports.

NotProvidedCount

This blog post isn’t about Google’s motivation for making this change, or about how to try to recover some of this lost data through other means. You can get some data from Google Webmaster Tools, or hope that a portion of your organic traffic comes from Yahoo and Bing, etc. There are plenty of good articles that cover tips for  that in detail, such as the following:

Instead, I’d like to focus on the opportunites this change provides for website owners and online marketers to go back to the basics and do a better job with some of the fundamentals of tracking. Search engine optimization (SEO) may be forever changed by this major change on Google’s part, but there are many best practices that haven’t changed — and in fact, this (Not Provided) trend makes them more important than ever before.

NotProvided

Opportunity 1: Google Adwords

This may seem to be playing into Google’s hands, since their stated motivation for encrypting the search results was to protect user privacy, but few have believed that.. Since paid advertising on Google still gives you the keyword data, most pundits have assumed the move to “(Not Provided)” for organic search was intended to keep the valuable search data for Google’s own use, and drive people toward paid advertising on Google Adwords and Google +.

However, I have long believed that every business should be doing some amount of Google Adwords experimentation. Even if you don’t have an advertising budget, spending $100+ a month on Google Adwords can provide some of the most cost effective research into your target market available anywhere. Get search volume and keyword data, see what types of ad text and headlines draws the most clicks, and more. Build out your keyword lists for your content marketing, see the keyword data you are no longer going to get from organic search, and hopefully get some conversions as a bonus.

utmcodes

Opportunity 2: Step up your Tracking

Since tracking of organic keywords is mostly if not completely going away in the age of ‘(Not Provided)”, time to step up your game in other areas. Be sure you are tracking everything else you can track, and plug up those gaps that have been on your marketing to-do list for months. Add tracking to your ecommerce, signup and contact us forms to get data on as many of your conversions as possible. (I am not objective in recommending my Campaign Tracker app for this, but please check it out  if you are using Salesforce CRM).  In the end, maximizing conversion tracking is more important than focusing on keywords that brought you clicks and traffic.

In addition, use Google Analytics campaign tags (utm_campaign, utm_source, etc.)  on any links to your site that you give out. Not just in your advertising URLs, but in your social media posts, links you give to your partners to publish on their sties, blog posts, directory listings and profiles, etc. Tagging your URLs will eliminate some of the untracked traffic from other sources (social media sharing or referral sites) and give you more consistent, better data for the incoming link data that you can control.

blogging_sucks_mousepad

Opportunity 3: Back to SEO Basics

Finally, for SEO go back to focusing on the basics — good site structure and good content. Without detailed organic keyword data, you won’t be able to do many of the search engine optimization tricks often promoted by some fly-by-night “we will increase your Google rankings” SEO firms — but you shouldn’t have been doing those things in the first place anyway. Tricks never work for long if they do work, and they can backfire badly.

Instead, accept that your site keyword data is going to be lacking, but use aggregate data from elsewhere — Google Webmaster Tools, Google Adwords — and start producing content that your audience would value. Blogging is very difficult to do regularly, but critical to this back-to-basics approach. Though for most busy professionals with multiple work responsibilities it is nearly impossible to find time to write regular blog posts, not only will they generate positive SEO returns, but they have the added benefit to establishing a voice and thought leadership for your particular field (or at least I hope so!)

What do you think of the Google ‘(Not Provided)’ change? Any tips you think I missed? Let us know in the contents below.

New Version of CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards Released

CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards, the AppExchange app which integrates Google Analytics data into Salesforce, has released a major upgrade today. The new version now supports up to 5 different web sites or Google Analytics profiles, automatically importing data for up to 5 profiles into Salesforce daily to be displayed in 5 sets of dashboards.

Simply install the 7 day free trial from the AppExchange, click a button to connect to Google Analytics, log in through your Google Account, and all Google Analytics Profiles available to that Account will be displayed for you to select. In less than 5 minutes you can see your web site traffic and visitor source breakdown, all displayed in Salesforce dashboards.

GADashboard-Installation-10-v2

With this new upgrade to the Analytics Dashboards app, not only can you choose to see data for up to 5 different web sites, but Google Analytics profiles (being renamed to Google Analytics Views) can also be filtered versions of a single web site’s analytics data. Common use cases of Google Analytics profiles / views include:

  • Exclude/include a certain section or directory of a web site

  • Exclude/include visitors from certain geographical areas

  • Exclude/include traffic from certain domain names

  • Any other filters you can apply in Google Analytics

This means that even if you only have one web site which you wish to keep track of in Salesforce, with support for 5 profiles you can now have geographical or content area filtering in some of your Salesforce dashboards.

Marketers wishing to focus on geographically targeted campaigns can now see the top of their funnel (web site visitors) in multiple sets of dashboards, typically an “All Website Data” profile as well as a geographically filtered profile. Salesforce users in larger organizations could select a profile of just the subsection of their corporate web site that they are responsible for.

CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards imports aggregate data for 13 different web analytics metrics daily, and displays it in prebuilt dashboards. It includes 5 sets of 3 different dashboards, with over 100 reports behind them. All data is stored natively in Salesforce, so everything can be modified and used in other reporting and dashboards. Try a free trial today, contact us for more information, or post any questions in the comments below.

%d bloggers like this: