Update your Salesforce Web-to-Lead forms by November 17, 2017

If your web site forms are posting Leads to Salesforce, and you are using the Salesforce-provided Web-to-Lead html code, you need to update your web site by November 17, 2017. If you do not, you will no longer receive new leads from Salesforce.

 

How do I know if I am using Salesforce’s Web-to-Lead code?

If you generated your form code by going to Setup | Build | Customize | Leads | Web-to-Lead | “Create Web-to-Lead”, or the existing forms on your web site begin with the following code:

<form action="https://www.salesforce.com/servlet/servlet.WebToLead?encoding=UTF-8" method="POST">

then you need to make this update.

If you have a custom-built form, ask your developer.

Form vendors such as Gravity Forms and Form Assembly should have made the changes to their systems to support the new endpoint already.

 

How do I update my web site?

  1. For any forms on your website that are Web-to-Lead forms, search the website HTML code for this code snippet:
https://www.salesforce.com/servlet/servlet.WebToLead

 

  1. Replace the “www” with “webto” so that the “form action” URLs in the Web-to-Lead HTML code display as such:
https://webto.salesforce.com/servlet/servlet.WebToLead

 

  1. Beyond just your “Contact Us” page or any inquiry forms, don’t forget to update landing page forms if you have them.

 

  1. TEST! Submit at least 1 test lead in every form, and check the results in Salesforce.

Only the web address to submit leads to is changing, so everything should continue working as before, but it is best to check in case a typo was made.

 

Why do I need to do this?

Salesforce will no longer be redirecting API calls to its www.salesforce.com endpoint, since this is used for its main web site. The new endpoint URL (webto.salesforce.com)  is already available, so updating as soon as possible is recommended to improve the performance and avoid the chances of losing any precious leads.

Note that if you have test forms that are pointing to Salesforce Sandboxes, no changes need to be made to those.

For more information, you can see Salesforce’s documentation on the web-to-lead changes.

 

Questions about Salesforce leads, forms, etc.?

Post any questions in the comments below and we’d be glad to help. Salesforce lead tracking is what CloudAmp is all about.

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How to Automatically Assign Salesforce Leads to Campaigns

Salesforce’s Web-to-Lead functionality is a great way to get leads directly into Salesforce. And Salesforce Campaigns provide useful data on what happened to the leads and contacts produced from various marketing activities.

Besides making sure inquiries don’t fall through the cracks by using web-to-lead functionality with Salesforce, any additional data you can add to your web site forms can help your business. Source and keyword data can be added in through an app like our Campaign Tracker, and there are a number of other things that can be added to the form through hidden fields.

One easy addition is to hard-code a particular Salesforce Campaign value in your web-to-lead forms.

This is especially useful if you have many landing pages that are specific to certain advertising campaigns, but you can even do it with your standard “Contact Us” form. Here’s how to do it:

 

  1. Create a Campaign in Salesforce (or go to an existing Campaign)

  2. Copy the ID of the Campaign from your web browser’s address bar

  3. Have your web designer add the following hidden field to your web-to-lead forms, replacing the value with the ID you copied earlier.
    <input type="hidden" name="Campaign_ID" value="7010V000001ufMI">
    
    
    
  4. That’s it! (But run a couple of test leads!)

 

These instructions assume you are using the HTML Salesforce provides in its Web-to-Lead form builder, but it should work (with some degree of modifications) on any form that posts leads into Salesforce.

You can also automatically assign a Lead Source to a particular form, in much the same way.

Be careful of doing this if you are getting the lead source from somewhere else, such as a picklist field on the form that the user fills out, or tracking software. You don’t want to overwrite any other data.

(The CloudAmp apps use their own lead source fields (First UTM Source, Last UTM Source, Lead Source Type, etc. and so will never put data in the standard Salesforce Lead Source field).

<input type=hidden id="lead_source" name="lead_source" value="Contact Us Form">

If you use these tricks, let me know your tips and tricks in the comments below, or hit me up with questions there as well.

Happy Campaigning.

How to Track Multi-touch Attribution in Salesforce

One of the most important aspects of marketing online is understanding the effectiveness of your different channels. Google Adwords, organic search / SEO, blog posts, webinars, email newsletters, and many more — all of these can be tracked if you are using the right tools, but your leads are not just coming in via one channel.

Frequently your prospects have interacted with multiple channels online before submitting a form and becoming a lead in Salesforce. These days most buyers are able to do fairly detailed research on their own before ever making contact and identifying themselves, so this trend is only intensifying.

Therefore, at a minimum you will see many leads who originally found you from Google Adwords or another advertisement, and sometime later remembered your company or ran across some of your great content and found you via an organic search, before becoming a lead in Salesforce.

Multi-touch attribution is the term for allocating credit across your marketing channels, to help estimate the impact each different channel had in delivering a lead, rather than just giving a single source all the credit. There are a number of different ways of doing attribution, from relatively straightforward to formulas and algorithms so complicated you’ll need to retake algebra. But most of them are better than single-touch attribution, meaning allocating 100% of the credit to a single way that a prospect came to your web site, when they really visited your site multiple times from different sources.

CloudAmp’s Campaign Tracker, a Salesforce app which helps marketers track sources, keywords and campaign effectiveness, is proud to introduce multi-touch attribution in our new Version 2.4. Now you can know both the First Touch (original source of how they found you) and Last Touch (final source that brought them to your site when they submitted a form) on all Leads that go into Salesforce via your web forms, in addition to the other data such as which pages a lead viewed on your site.

Having both First Touch and Last Touch data on all of your Salesforce leads is a straightforward and uncomplicated way to handle multi-touch attribution, yet for most customers provides a very effective way of allocating and understanding marketing effectiveness across your various campaigns and channels.

firstlasttouchleadsource

And once the First and Last Touch tracking data is part of a lead in Salesforce, the attribution data moves through Salesforce’s conversion process to the Account / Contact / Opportunity. So your multi-touch attribution data survives to the converted lead, pipeline, and closed won opportunity to directly relate to revenue.

Find out more by contacting us, or sign up for a 15 day free trial of the Campaign Tracker on the Salesforce AppExchange.

How to Track Conversion Rates and Key Funnel Metrics in Salesforce

If you work in Marketing or Sales Operations, you need to understand the current status and trends of your funnel. Or maybe you’ve been tasked to provide some key performance indicators (KPIs) to management, and need to provide some specific numbers behind the overall performance.

How big is your universe of prospects, what does the lead volume look like, and how are conversion rates between the different stages of your marketing / sales funnel trending?

Getting this data in Salesforce is complicated, requiring the writing of formulas and use of matrix reports to see conversion rates from leads to opportunities, and open to closed won opportunities. Many of us turn to Microsoft Excel, where the math is easier to manage, but getting the data there requires a lot of manual work.

And all of that is assuming you can get ahold of all the data you need to analyze it in Salesforce or spreadsheets. In this blog post I’ll show you an easier way of visualizing your funnel and conversion metrics in Salesforce, with a new feature of the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards.

Since its release in 2012, the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards app has helped businesses automatically import top-of-the-funnel data from Google Analytics into Salesforce. In less than 10 minutes, this affordable self-service app can be installed, connected to Google Analytics with the click of a button, and be displaying users, pageviews, goal completion and other web site metrics in a series of prebuilt Salesforce dashboards and reports.

Google Analytics can show you the top of your funnel (web site visitors / app users), which is data that is typically missing from Salesforce. The Salesforce data model starts with leads, either from your web site web-to-lead forms or imported from other sources. It then proceeds as you convert qualified leads (however you define that internally) to Accounts with Contacts and Opportunities.

FunnelDetailSmalll

So you have Leads, Converted Leads (Contacts/Opportunities), and Won Opportunities ($), plus now you can add Users (Web Site Visitors / App Users) to the beginning of that funnel. And with the prebuilt Funnel tab in the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards app, the conversion percentages between each stage are automatically calculated for you — web site visitors to leads conversion rate, leads to converted leads percentage, opportunities to closed won opportunities conversion rate.

In addition, buttons below the funnel allow you to switch between 30, 60, and 90 day time periods, to see how things are trending at a glance. And an easy configuration panel on the right allows you to switch the source reports that drive the funnel, or edit them to apply a filter. That can be helpful if you want to only show leads from a particular web site in the funnel, or remove leads imported from a recent tradeshow from the funnel conversion percentages.

So try it out and let us know what you think, and feel free to ask questions below.

How to See What Web Pages a Lead Visited

When new leads come into Salesforce from the forms on your web site, do you wish you could know more about them than just the data they volunteered? Not only where they came from and how they found you, but maybe some hints about which of your products or services they are most interested in, and what parts of your web site they spent the most time on?

In this post we show how to use the Campaign Tracker, a Salesforce app available on the AppExchange, to quickly and easily show you which pages on your web site a lead visited before they submitted that contact us form.

VisitorSessionsEditSmallest

Why Track Pages Visited?

In Campaign Tracker 2.0, CloudAmp introduced a new feature called Visitor Sessions, which shows you how many times a lead visited your site, which pages they viewed, and when.

The capability was not driven by a desire to be “big brother” or collect data for data’s sake. Instead it was requested by many of our customers, who wanted to be able to better engage with their prospects, and get a bit of a head start in serving the leads who came in to Salesforce.

LeadPageLayout2withVisitorSessions

Campaign Tracker already provided the initial source, keywords, and campaign information about how a lead found a web site, but our customers wanted to answer questions such as:

  • How many times did a lead come to the site before submitting a form?
  • How many pages on the web site did the lead look at?
  • What product(s) was the lead interested in?
  • Did the lead consume a lot of content, or did they just quickly click the contact form?
  • Is this lead in the early research phase, just viewing a few high-level pages?
  • Is this lead in a later buying stage, looking at documentation and other specialized pages?
  • Is this lead unqualified (eg. only looked at jobs page)?
  • What else can we infer from the pages this lead visited on the site, before we call or email to follow up with the lead?

VisitorSessionsAppFrontier

How to Track a Lead’s Web Page Visits

Getting started recording which pages a lead visited on your web site is pretty straightforward. The Campaign Tracker has a free 15 day trial, after which it is available month to month for a low subscription cost (annual plans available for a discount). Install the Campaign Tracker from the AppExchange into Salesforce and configure a few things, then add some tracking code to the bottom of the pages of your web site, and you’ll be collecting data.

When a lead submits a form on your web site that goes into Salesforce (Salesforce web-to-lead or other form technology), along with the original source tracking data (keywords, referrer, etc.) a list of the pages, URLs, and timestamps of pages on your web site will also be submitted in the background, and inserted into the correct fields in Salesforce.

 

Using Visitor Sessions in Salesforce

Each Visitor Session record that the Campaign Tracker saves into Salesforce shows the details of a particular page that the lead visited on your web site. It shows the Page Title, Page URL, Session Number (was this the lead’s first or second visit, etc.), and a date / time stamp of when they landed on that web page. Viewing these records in the related list on the Lead page, you can get a general understanding of the following:

  • the path the lead took through your web site
  • which pages the lead visited
  • what pages the lead spent the most time on
  • what products / services the lead might be interested in
  • what concerns the lead might have (price, security, customer reviews, etc.)
  • what the lead looked at on repeat visits (if they returned more than once before submitting a form into Salesforce)

VisitorSessionsRecord

You can also retain this data as you move the lead through the sales process. When you convert a lead to an Account in Salesforce (with related Contact and Opportunity), the Visitor Sessions stay with the Contact, so you retain the record of which pages on your web site the Salesforce contact visited before they filled out your form.

In addition, you can get some aggregate data about the most popular pages on your web site, at least as far as those who become leads in Salesforce. It is a limited but potentially important metric, and one more more data point to add to what you learn from Google Analytics or other web analytics tools you may use.


Questions about getting page view data into Salesforce? Is there other data you would like to see in your Salesforce leads? Please let me know in the comments below.

Campaign Tracker 2.0 Now Live

CloudAmp is pleased to announce the release of Campaign Tracker 2.0, the Salesforce app which lets you track Google Adwords, keywords, and other source data into your Salesforce leads. Campaign Tracker has always been the simplest and best way of tracking your advertising ROI and marketing analytics in Salesforce, and now with the release of version 2.0 it is even better.

 VisitorSessionsRelatedListEdit

Visitor Sessions

New in Campaign Tracker 2.0 is the ability to see which pages on your web site a lead visited before they submitted a lead form. Called Visitor Sessions, this new feature is available right in individual leads and contacts within Salesforce for easy reference during the sales process.

See the page titles and URLs in Salesforce of the entire path that a prospect took on your web site. Session numbers even show repeat visits, so your sales and marketing teams can see at a glance what parts of your web site a lead looked at, plus when and where they returned each time they visited your site before they became a lead in Salesforce.

Now with Campaign Tracker 2.0, you can identify which products a lead might be interested in, and understand potential lead value ahead of time — all based on which pages they viewed on your web site.

 CampaignTracker2_Dashboard_SearchEnginesKeywords

Better Tracking Technology

Campaign Tracker 2.0 was completely rebuilt from the ground up to make it easier to implement and provide more reliable data collection.

Version 2.0 no longer relies on cookies or data from Google Analytics, so it provides an independent way of verifying lead sources and other information. Plus we’ve simplified the installation process to support pretty much any web site form you might have.


For a FREE 15 day trial, including email and phone support to help you get the Campaign Tracker set up and tested, please sign up on the AppExchange.

Google Analytics Changes: Visits and Unique Visitors now Sessions and Users

Google Analytics rolled out some changes in April 2014 rather quietly, changing the naming of some of their most important metrics. The terminology changes were made to better support Google’s new Universal Analytics, which can measure traffic across both web and apps.

SessionsUsers-GoogleAnalytics2

Visits is now Sessions

The first major change is that Google Analytics has changed Visits to be called Sessions. The concept of sessions has always existed in Google Analytics, as a way of measuring actions a visitor takes on your web site within a given timeframe. Google Analytics defaults the session length to 30 minutes, though it can be customized to between 1 minute and 4 hours.

This means that if a user visits different pages on your web site, downloads files etc., and then views more pages several hours later, these are considered separate sessions (and previously would have been labeled as separate visits).

 

Unique Visitors is now Users

Secondly, the previous app metric Active Users has been combined with the web metric Visitors, and both are now just combined under the same name, Users.

In addition to unifying the reporting across web and app reporting for the new Google Analytics Universal Analytics, it also makes things a bit less confusing as Visits and Visitors often caused confusion since the terms are quite similar. This is why Visitors were generally referred to as Unique Visitors — and now they are Users, which makes more sense still.

 

For any users of the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards, which imports Google Analytics data into Salesforce to be displayed as part of your Salesforce dashboards, we will be updating the labels on the fields and reports in our next release in early June. That release will also include geographical data and improvements on reporting on Users (formerly Unique Visitors).

 

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