How to Track Conversion Rates and Key Funnel Metrics in Salesforce

If you work in Marketing or Sales Operations, you need to understand the current status and trends of your funnel. Or maybe you’ve been tasked to provide some key performance indicators (KPIs) to management, and need to provide some specific numbers behind the overall performance.

How big is your universe of prospects, what does the lead volume look like, and how are conversion rates between the different stages of your marketing / sales funnel trending?

Getting this data in Salesforce is complicated, requiring the writing of formulas and use of matrix reports to see conversion rates from leads to opportunities, and open to closed won opportunities. Many of us turn to Microsoft Excel, where the math is easier to manage, but getting the data there requires a lot of manual work.

And all of that is assuming you can get ahold of all the data you need to analyze it in Salesforce or spreadsheets. In this blog post I’ll show you an easier way of visualizing your funnel and conversion metrics in Salesforce, with a new feature of the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards.

Since its release in 2012, the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards app has helped businesses automatically import top-of-the-funnel data from Google Analytics into Salesforce. In less than 10 minutes, this affordable self-service app can be installed, connected to Google Analytics with the click of a button, and be displaying users, pageviews, goal completion and other web site metrics in a series of prebuilt Salesforce dashboards and reports.

Google Analytics can show you the top of your funnel (web site visitors / app users), which is data that is typically missing from Salesforce. The Salesforce data model starts with leads, either from your web site web-to-lead forms or imported from other sources. It then proceeds as you convert qualified leads (however you define that internally) to Accounts with Contacts and Opportunities.


So you have Leads, Converted Leads (Contacts/Opportunities), and Won Opportunities ($), plus now you can add Users (Web Site Visitors / App Users) to the beginning of that funnel. And with the prebuilt Funnel tab in the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards app, the conversion percentages between each stage are automatically calculated for you — web site visitors to leads conversion rate, leads to converted leads percentage, opportunities to closed won opportunities conversion rate.

In addition, buttons below the funnel allow you to switch between 30, 60, and 90 day time periods, to see how things are trending at a glance. And an easy configuration panel on the right allows you to switch the source reports that drive the funnel, or edit them to apply a filter. That can be helpful if you want to only show leads from a particular web site in the funnel, or remove leads imported from a recent tradeshow from the funnel conversion percentages.

So try it out and let us know what you think, and feel free to ask questions below.

How to See What Web Pages a Lead Visited

When new leads come into Salesforce from the forms on your web site, do you wish you could know more about them than just the data they volunteered? Not only where they came from and how they found you, but maybe some hints about which of your products or services they are most interested in, and what parts of your web site they spent the most time on?

In this post we show how to use the Campaign Tracker, a Salesforce app available on the AppExchange, to quickly and easily show you which pages on your web site a lead visited before they submitted that contact us form.


Why Track Pages Visited?

In Campaign Tracker 2.0, CloudAmp introduced a new feature called Visitor Sessions, which shows you how many times a lead visited your site, which pages they viewed, and when.

The capability was not driven by a desire to be “big brother” or collect data for data’s sake. Instead it was requested by many of our customers, who wanted to be able to better engage with their prospects, and get a bit of a head start in serving the leads who came in to Salesforce.


Campaign Tracker already provided the initial source, keywords, and campaign information about how a lead found a web site, but our customers wanted to answer questions such as:

  • How many times did a lead come to the site before submitting a form?
  • How many pages on the web site did the lead look at?
  • What product(s) was the lead interested in?
  • Did the lead consume a lot of content, or did they just quickly click the contact form?
  • Is this lead in the early research phase, just viewing a few high-level pages?
  • Is this lead in a later buying stage, looking at documentation and other specialized pages?
  • Is this lead unqualified (eg. only looked at jobs page)?
  • What else can we infer from the pages this lead visited on the site, before we call or email to follow up with the lead?


How to Track a Lead’s Web Page Visits

Getting started recording which pages a lead visited on your web site is pretty straightforward. The Campaign Tracker has a free 15 day trial, after which it is available month to month for a low subscription cost (annual plans available for a discount). Install the Campaign Tracker from the AppExchange into Salesforce and configure a few things, then add some tracking code to the bottom of the pages of your web site, and you’ll be collecting data.

When a lead submits a form on your web site that goes into Salesforce (Salesforce web-to-lead or other form technology), along with the original source tracking data (keywords, referrer, etc.) a list of the pages, URLs, and timestamps of pages on your web site will also be submitted in the background, and inserted into the correct fields in Salesforce.


Using Visitor Sessions in Salesforce

Each Visitor Session record that the Campaign Tracker saves into Salesforce shows the details of a particular page that the lead visited on your web site. It shows the Page Title, Page URL, Session Number (was this the lead’s first or second visit, etc.), and a date / time stamp of when they landed on that web page. Viewing these records in the related list on the Lead page, you can get a general understanding of the following:

  • the path the lead took through your web site
  • which pages the lead visited
  • what pages the lead spent the most time on
  • what products / services the lead might be interested in
  • what concerns the lead might have (price, security, customer reviews, etc.)
  • what the lead looked at on repeat visits (if they returned more than once before submitting a form into Salesforce)


You can also retain this data as you move the lead through the sales process. When you convert a lead to an Account in Salesforce (with related Contact and Opportunity), the Visitor Sessions stay with the Contact, so you retain the record of which pages on your web site the Salesforce contact visited before they filled out your form.

In addition, you can get some aggregate data about the most popular pages on your web site, at least as far as those who become leads in Salesforce. It is a limited but potentially important metric, and one more more data point to add to what you learn from Google Analytics or other web analytics tools you may use.

Questions about getting page view data into Salesforce? Is there other data you would like to see in your Salesforce leads? Please let me know in the comments below.

Campaign Tracker 2.0 Now Live

CloudAmp is pleased to announce the release of Campaign Tracker 2.0, the Salesforce app which lets you track Google Adwords, keywords, and other source data into your Salesforce leads. Campaign Tracker has always been the simplest and best way of tracking your advertising ROI and marketing analytics in Salesforce, and now with the release of version 2.0 it is even better.


Visitor Sessions

New in Campaign Tracker 2.0 is the ability to see which pages on your web site a lead visited before they submitted a lead form. Called Visitor Sessions, this new feature is available right in individual leads and contacts within Salesforce for easy reference during the sales process.

See the page titles and URLs in Salesforce of the entire path that a prospect took on your web site. Session numbers even show repeat visits, so your sales and marketing teams can see at a glance what parts of your web site a lead looked at, plus when and where they returned each time they visited your site before they became a lead in Salesforce.

Now with Campaign Tracker 2.0, you can identify which products a lead might be interested in, and understand potential lead value ahead of time — all based on which pages they viewed on your web site.


Better Tracking Technology

Campaign Tracker 2.0 was completely rebuilt from the ground up to make it easier to implement and provide more reliable data collection.

Version 2.0 no longer relies on cookies or data from Google Analytics, so it provides an independent way of verifying lead sources and other information. Plus we’ve simplified the installation process to support pretty much any web site form you might have.

For a FREE 15 day trial, including email and phone support to help you get the Campaign Tracker set up and tested, please sign up on the AppExchange.

Google Analytics Changes: Visits and Unique Visitors now Sessions and Users

Google Analytics rolled out some changes in April 2014 rather quietly, changing the naming of some of their most important metrics. The terminology changes were made to better support Google’s new Universal Analytics, which can measure traffic across both web and apps.


Visits is now Sessions

The first major change is that Google Analytics has changed Visits to be called Sessions. The concept of sessions has always existed in Google Analytics, as a way of measuring actions a visitor takes on your web site within a given timeframe. Google Analytics defaults the session length to 30 minutes, though it can be customized to between 1 minute and 4 hours.

This means that if a user visits different pages on your web site, downloads files etc., and then views more pages several hours later, these are considered separate sessions (and previously would have been labeled as separate visits).


Unique Visitors is now Users

Secondly, the previous app metric Active Users has been combined with the web metric Visitors, and both are now just combined under the same name, Users.

In addition to unifying the reporting across web and app reporting for the new Google Analytics Universal Analytics, it also makes things a bit less confusing as Visits and Visitors often caused confusion since the terms are quite similar. This is why Visitors were generally referred to as Unique Visitors — and now they are Users, which makes more sense still.


For any users of the CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards, which imports Google Analytics data into Salesforce to be displayed as part of your Salesforce dashboards, we will be updating the labels on the fields and reports in our next release in early June. That release will also include geographical data and improvements on reporting on Users (formerly Unique Visitors).


5 Big Ways to Maximize Your Salesforce Dashboards (Guest post on the Salesforce blog)

Today we published a guest post on the Salesforce blog titled “5 Big Ways to Maximize Your Salesforce Dashboards”. The post details a number of high level steps you can take to really make the most of Salesforce dashboards, including links to a number of free dashboard packages on the AppExchange and other resources.

So much of our critical data is stored in Salesforce, and dashboards provide an easy visualization tool that automatically refreshes with the latest data, no spreadsheet updates required. If you are a Salesforce user and you are not using Salesforce dashboards, check out the post and then get started!

The 5 topic areas covered, that will help you make optimal use of Salesforce dashboards, are the following:

  1. Agree on Metrics
  2. Start with Existing Templates
  3. Have Main KPI / Executive Dashboards
  4. Bring other data into Salesforce
  5. Email Your Dashboards

Check out the guest post now on the Salesforce blog.


Other resources mentioned in the article:

If you are new to Saleforce dashboards, check out our other recent post on How to Customize Salesforce Dashboards.

Setting Goals for Your Site: An Intro to Google Analytics Goals

Setting goals for ourselves is one of the best ways to achieve things personally and professionally — so why should your web site be any different? This quick introduction shows you how to use Goals in Google Analytics to measure some target objectives you have for your web site.

Goal-setting in Google Analytics is simpler than many goals we have in life. A Google Analytics goal is just a measure of how often visitors to your web site complete a certain action, such as spending a certain amount of time on a page, visiting one page after starting on another, or events such as form submissions or eCommerce transactions. Each time a user completes one of the Goals you have set up, it is recorded as a conversion in Google Analytics.


Setting Up Google Analytics Goals

You can create up to 20 Goals per View (formerly called Google Analytics Profiles). To create a Goal:

  1. Cick Admin, then select an account, property, and a view.
  2. Click Goals, then Create a Goal.
  3. Choose a Template to start with some prebuilt goal examples, or choose Custom to create your own goal from scratch.
  4. There are 4 basic types of goals you can create:
    1. Destination – a specific location loads, or path taken through your site
    2. Duration – how long a visitor session lasts
    3. Pages/Screens per session – how many pages or screens a visitor views
    4. Event – something happens such as a video play, social share
  5. Optionally set a Goal Value, which is the monetary value of a user completing the Goal.
  6. Click Verify to test the setup of your goal
  7. Save the Goal

Once you create a Goal, it starts recording data for all current and future sessions. Goals cannot be deleted, but they can be turned off, or edited to become a different goal.

If you have set the optional monetary Goal Value, you can start evaluating goals by that measure. But even without it, you will start seeing Goal Conversions (a visitor session that completes your goal is considered a Goal conversion in Google Analytics).

Note that Goals related to Ecommerce tracking require additional setup and configuration. Event Goals may also require that you set up Event Tracking in Google Analytics prior (especially as they relate to events such as events such as downloads), which often needs to be done by a developer.


Viewing Google Analytics Goal Conversions in Salesforce

If you are using Salesforce in addition to Google Analytics, you can import Google Analytics Goal Conversion data to Salesforce, for web site conversion visibility alongside the conversion metrics that are the mainstay of Salesforce (leads to accounts, and opportunities to closed won deals).

Our CloudAmp Analytics Dashboards application automatically imports a number of metrics daily from Google Analytics and displays it in Salesforce dashboards. All 20 Goal Names and Goal Conversion numbers from each Google Analytics View are imported and displayed in 2 Salesforce dashboards. The Google Analytics Goal data is also stored natively in a Salesforce custom object, so you can also use it in other reports and dashboards if you wish.


The “goal” of the Analytics Dashboards app is to make it easy to have daily visibility into the conversion Goals you have set up for your website, right inside Salesforce where you work on a daily basis. Getting this visibility before visitors would typically enter Salesforce as leads can help improve your conversions and optimize marketing efforts earlier in the funnel.

Questions? Have some favorite Google Analytics Goals you like to track? Please leave them in the comments below.


April 2 Salesforce Data Analytics Meetup: DxContinuum & GoodData

Thank you to DxContinuum and GoodData for sponsoring and providing the food and drinks, as well as demos of two very interesting data analytics platform for Salesforce.

DxContinuum is an early-stage startup gaining significant traction with Fortune 1000 clients due to their predictive analytics capabilities around which leads and opportunities in Salesforce will close. GoodData showed off their embedded business intelligence and analytics tools for Salesforce, with some great looking data visualizations that are setting the standard for the next generation of BI.


The videos below are by Aline. For all your video blog needs contact her at 415 377 0245

Next Meetup is June 4, 2014 – register here free.

Satish Kumar, DxContinuum

Satish Kumar is the Director of Product Management at DxContinuum. He has been in Software Product Management for the last 12+ years, with rich experience in CRM, Enterprise Big Data, and Analytics. Satish is passionate about driving business value using analytics. His experience in analytics ranges from  statistical analysis based reporting, scorecard applications, dashboard / visualizations, through predictive modeling & optimization. Prior to DxContinuum, Satish had been in Risk Management Solution (RMS) and Automatic Data Processing (ADP). Satish has a degree in Engineering from Annamalai University (India) and an MBA from the Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore.

Product / Demo brief

What if you can predict which leads and opportunities will become wins with 85%+ accuracy, with existing data in Salesforce? What if you can focus on the right leads & opportunities, enhance conversions & win rates, and increase revenues by 25%, with the same resources? We shall look at how to leverage predictive analytics to accomplish these business goals and answer questions such as:

1. What leads should be prioritized for a call right away?  What leads should be nurtured over time?

2. What is the quality of opportunities in the pipeline? What proportion of active opportunities are likely to be won?

3. Will quota be met? If not, what is the expected shortfall, and what can be done to reduce it?


Kyle Pistor, GoodData

Kyle Pistor is a Senior Solutions Engineer at GoodData. He is responsible for the presales technical evaluation, building proof of concept projects, as well as architecting the appropriate solutions for clients as they move from evaluation to implementation. Kyle has been with GoodData for two years, and has seen many clients – large and small – use GoodData to quickly go from messy, disparate data to clean automated data, reports, and dashboards. Prior to GoodData, Kyle worked at pre-IPO SolarCity, as well as a smaller solar company that collected and monitored massive data sets on large photovoltaic systems.  Kyle has a B.S. and a M.S in Engineering from Santa Clara University.

Kyle demoed GoodData’s Salesforce Sales Analytics capabilities, which deliver more relevant sales analytics, cross-object reporting, historical trending and beautiful, easy-to-use dashboards.


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